Researching in Brisbane Again

photo of young girl dressed up as a nurse and young boy dressed up as a wounded soldier with arm in sling.

Like children in many parts of the world, Queensland children were affected by the Great War. This cover of the weekly newspaper, The Queenslander from 1st December 1917, is captioned, “The Spirit of the Times”. Image courtesy of State Library of Queensland.

Over the last few weeks I have returned to my research roots. I have been exploring the history of Brisbane from the turn of the twentieth century to the beginning of the Depression. My client is interested in the life story of a man who was born in Brisbane in the early twentieth century who moved to Sydney as an adult. He went on to work in East Asia during World War II and then became a successful business man. It is a pleasure to be part of such an interesting multi-national, collaborative project.

Once again I have been exploring the education history of the time, the politics, the culture and the experiences of young people growing up in Brisbane during this era. Fortunately I still have the references and workings for my honours thesis which was about Queensland’s Bible in State Schools Referendum held in 1910. Some of the work I did on that is relevant for my current research.

I gladly left our sodden house for a research trip to Brisbane – what a delight to have working lights and a good internet connection for a few days! I immersed myself in old records the Queensland State Archives and the State Library of Queensland as well as exploring the local area where our man had grown up. A good sense of place is important if an historian to portray the history well. There is nothing like walking the streets and visiting the places which are the sites of the history that is being researched. Continue reading

Historians Talk History in Brisbane

Inside a sandstone passage that runs on the exterior of a UQ building.

The University of Queensland is one of the ‘Group of Eight’ universities commonly known as ‘sandstone universities’ because most of these universities have iconic buildings made out of… sandstone! I took this picture at UQ on a research trip back in 2010.

It is that time of the year again, the annual festival of history known as the annual conference of the Australian Historical Association. I will be tweeting and blogging from the conference in Brisbane this week. So if you enjoy reading about the latest in the Australian history world keep an eye on this blog and follow the conference hashtag on Twitter -#OzHA2014.

The conference opened in the way it should – with a Welcome to Country by Aboriginal elder, Aunty Lilla Watson. A ‘Welcome to Country’ is a courtesy at official events in Australia. It is part of Aboriginal protocol when someone enters their land. It is like knocking on the door and listening to the greeting before we are invited inside. By inviting an Aboriginal person to do a Welcome to Country the conference organisers show respect to the indigenous people on whose land the event is being held.

“Westerners like to locate history in individuals”, said Aunty Lilla Watson. She explained that Aboriginal people have a different perspective about history. “Something so important as history for Aboriginals cannot be located in someone as fragile as human beings”, she said. “The greatest thing in our lives is land – tells us who we are, where we belong.” Watson talked about the custodial ethic that Aborigines have regarding the land. “That is not just Aboriginal people’s responsibility”, she argued. It is everybody’s responsibility to ensure we have clean land and clean water. Continue reading

The Anzac Day Silence, Religion and Garland

At today’s National Ceremony for Anzac Day attendees will stand for one minute’s silence to remember all those who have lost their lives in wars and to reflect on what Anzac Day means. The minute’s silence has been part of Anzac Day since the first commemorations of Anzac Day on 25th April 1916. Digitisation of old documents allows us to see how the Anzac Day we know today was first conceived.

As I noted in my post, The Emergence of Anzac Day, planning for the first anniversary of the landing of Australian and New Zealand troops at Gallipoli started early in 1916. Queensland’s Anzac Day Commemoration Committee (ADCC) was formed at a public meeting in Brisbane on 10th January, 1916. This committee war chaired by the Premier of Queensland, T J Ryan, and included leaders of the Roman Catholic, Church of England, Presbyterian and Methodist churches, the Salvation Army, members of parliament, the mayors of Brisbane and South Brisbane, members of local councils and military representatives. The honorary secretary was an army chaplain, Canon D J Garland.

Canon David John Garland

Canon David John Garland

Canon Garland was a Church of England priest who had years of experience in public advocacy. He had been instrumental in campaigns which led to religious education being reintroduced in state schools in Western Australia (1893) and Queensland (1910). Most recently he had been invited to New Zealand to lead a campaign to have religious education reintroduced in schools there. The outbreak of World War I had derailed this campaign. Garland moved back to Brisbane and became a military chaplain.

Garland was asked by the Anzac Day Commemoration Committee in 1916 to devise a program which could be used throughout Queensland to commemorate Anzac Day. Committee member, H J Diddams recalled in 1921 that the program Garland submitted to the ADCC on February 18th included a minute’s silence (Diddams, p. 9). The ADCC encouraged towns and cities throughout Queensland to follow this program, the elements of which were publicised in newspapers such as The Brisbane Courier. Continue reading

Mapping Australia’s Natural Disasters: Space and Time

Just outside Tully #TCYasi on Twitpic

Just one image from the Tully area after Cyclone Yasi hit. Source: cycloneupdate on Twitpic.

Yet another natural disaster is unfolding in Queensland with tropical cyclone Yasi crossing the coast of Far North Queensland.  There was not much sleep in our household on Wednesday night as we have family members who live right at the heart of the destructive forces of the cyclone.  I resumed this post at around 1 am Thursday morning.  Blogging while keeping an eye on Twitter and regular media is the best way of dealing with the anxiety.

We had a phone call from our family near Tully at the height of the cyclone just after midnight.  They asked when the eye of the cyclone would hit.  Already they had lost some windows, had to nail a board over the door to stop it from opening and then a tree fell on their house.  They had no electricity and little idea of when it was all going to end.  Their house was swaying in the ferocious winds.

We turned to the Bureau of Meteorology’s radar image and map for the information that they needed.  Maps are indispensable when dealing with a natural disaster.  It is hard to understand the extent of the recent natural disasters in Australia without maps.  Maps record the area or space, that has been affected by the disaster.  Floods in Australia have been mapped since early settlement.  In order to get a better perspective of this summer of disastrous weather conditions in Australia I have been referring to maps of the current situation as well as historical maps. Continue reading

Saving Damaged Archives

Queensland State Library

Before: State Library of Queensland April 2010. Source: Zayzayem on flickr

The lower floors of the QLD state library in Brisbane is star... on Twitpic

After: State Library of Queensland 12 Jan 2011. Source: @jonoH on twitpic

Five states have now been affected by floods in Australia in the last month. In my earlier posts both on this blog and On Line Opinion, I have followed the difficulties faced by archives and libraries in face of natural disasters and specifically focussed on the travails of the State Library of Queensland. Now, nearly two weeks later, we can get a better picture of what has occurred and the recovery process.  More importantly, there is something that we can do to help flood-affected families recover the personal photos that they have lost. Continue reading